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at sign (address sign or @)

The at sign, @, is normally read aloud as

The at sign, "Klammeraffe", separates the person from the machine for the Internet and e-mail alike: Anyone looking further back still, will encounter, after a huge void - computer freaks are noticeably no fans of history - and without fail the American handwriting researcher and paleographer Berthold Louis Ullman, who held the opinion in his book "Ancient Writing and its Influence" , Reprint Cambridge , Reprint Toronto [Z But neither Ullman's book with any sort of evidence nor another veritable quotation with an at sign "Klammeraffe" from the Middle Ages was to be found. He had no idea he was creating an icon for the wired world. Pure Storage Pure Storage is a provider of enterprise data flash storage solutions designed to substitute for electromechanical disk arrays.

On the Internet, @ (pronounced
The at sign, @, is normally read aloud as
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For further information about making an offer please go to: Bidding Information FYI email History of the @ The @symbol has been branded upon virtually every user on the Web MoMA’s Department of Architecture and Design Acquires The @ Symbol Into Its Collection - Tag Acquisition.
With the introduction of e-mail came the popularity of the @ symbol. The @ symbol or the

The at sign, @, is normally read aloud as

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We'll send you an email containing your password. Your password has been sent to: They had asked him to come up with a system for electronic mail. Tomlinson was searching for a way to clearly and unmistakably separate the name of the user from the machines' and domains' identities. He searched for a symbol, which would never appear in a person's name. So he scrutinized the keyboard, the one he himself was using, a "Model 33 Teletype".

The symbol could not be a number or a letter. The , "Affenohr" monkey ear , had an advantage because it signifies "at" and, therefore, complied with Tomlinson's requirements. Tomlinson had no idea that he was paving the world with a new letter.

Yet, many of his friends where appalled at his decision, because in computer systems of that time the "Klammeraffe" was the control character for deleting a line; now suddenly, the "line killing" character was shortening letters in an awkward manner. In April , this problem too was solved by way of a new agreement on a standard letterhead. The , at sign, could no longer murder lines, but rather spread harmlessly. Anyone desiring to research the early origin of this fashionable symbol from America, which has so forcefully invaded our culture, has a hard nut to crack.

By the old master of German typographers, Hermann Zapf of Frankfurt am Main , had already collected and published all relevant pictographs and type signals in "Zapf Dingbats". Two variations of the at sign "Klammeraffe" appear there. Therefore, the "at" sign was already so well established in the USA, that it was allowed before the uppercase "a" on the code list. Our at sign "Klammeraffe" was not yet represented in the 5-bit code of the 19th century Frenchman, Emile Baudot data speed "baud" was named for him.

An excel lent connaisseur of Anglo-American culture assured, that the "at" sign was the counterpart of the French à with an accent grave: Merchants in England had supposedly written the on their price tags in this way for a long time.

That's why the at sign "Klammeraffe" is called a "commercial a" in the English speaking world. As such, it was already found on the first American typewriters. It appears to have been at home in Sweden for an equally long time. Much earlier still, the symbol appeared on the Iberian Peninsula; it is said to have been brought there for the first time in the year Spanish, Portuguese and then French merchants as well dealt in steers and wine, thereby using a measure for solids and liquids, "arroba", approximately 10 kilograms 25 libras or about 15 litres.

The word Ar-roub is of Arabic origin and means " a quarter". The name arroba for has been preserved in Spain and France ever since. He found it in newspaper Repubblica: Anyone looking further back still, will encounter, after a huge void - computer freaks are noticeably no fans of history - and without fail the American handwriting researcher and paleographer Berthold Louis Ullman, who held the opinion in his book "Ancient Writing and its Influence" , Reprint Cambridge , Reprint Toronto [Z U4], that the "Klammeraffe" was supposedly a monastic ligature or abbreviation in Latin handwritings of the Middle Ages.

Writers of that time had supposedly used it to abbreviate the Latin "ad" at, to , a common word at that time, due to a lack of space or for convenience sake. But neither Ullman's book with any sort of evidence nor another veritable quotation with an at sign "Klammeraffe" from the Middle Ages was to be found. Indeed, abbreviations and ligatures only came about six hundred years later. The five Latin documents of the late Middle Ages, which were found in my private little library, foundation documents and the like, a coincidence test then, all had well written out "ad"s in many variations.

But they were calligraphic, official documents. Incorrect reports are found in books on signs and symbols from all over the world as well. No sign in Middle Age. In a book on letters by Carl Faulmann , newly printed in Nürnberg by Greno Delphi , several writings on the Middle Ages are found, including a detailed list of abbreviations and ligatures of that time.

The at sign "Klammeraffe" is nowhere to be found there. Only an initial from the 9th century shows great similarity to the , but this is an uppercase G. A medievalist, professor, connoisseur of handwriting from Freiburg University in Germany, laughed derisively when asked about an "Affenohr" in Latin handwriting: A presently overflowing source for international naming of the at sign " is the Internet.

The American linguist Karen Steffen Chung, who resides in Taiwan, had asked about the name of the symbol in the native tongue of her addressees per e-mail. The list, which she publicized in the Internet, encompasses -- with addendum -- 40 languages including Esperanto, referred to her by senders from many countries.

Our set no limits for linguistic fantasy. The new names reach from the Serbian "crazy a" to the poetic Turkish "rose". One Esperanto fan baptized it spider monkey, the Danes call the sow's tail, while the Danes, Norwegians and Swedes call it an elephant's trunk. The British, the French, the Israelis and the Koreans made a snail of it, which results in a curious contrast to "snail mail". The Mandarin Chinese call the little mouse, the Greeks duckling.

The Finns and Swedes have conceived cat metaphors as well: The Russians in contrast always call the puppy sobachka. The Spanish, Portuguese, Catalonians and French continue in the use of the old Arabic name for measure: Pastry has to sacrifice for the old Hebrew strudel, the Swedish cinnamon roll, maybe for the Polish pig's ear, a sweet pastry delight, in any case for the Russian round biscuit.

Worm or maggot Kukac is what the Hungarians call the , the Thais ringed worm. Strong in visual imagination the Norwegians: Very witty are the British, who with a strong visual imagination quite simply call the laughter.

A particularly original depiction comes from Chechen and out of Slovakia: While explaining this word, the document broke off. After a portion of this view on the symbol had appeared in the ZEIT newspaper March 7, under the headline "The flipped out ligature", readers illuminated the at sign "Affenohr" in yet other ways.

Automatically send the right message at the right makeshop-mdrcky9h.ga has been visited by 10K+ users in the past month. The at sign, @, is normally read aloud as "at"; it is also commonly called the at symbol or commercial at. It is used as an accounting and invoice abbreviation meaning "at a rate of" (e.g. 7 widgets @ £ 2 = £14), [1] but it is now most commonly used in email addresses and social media platform " handles ". With the introduction of e-mail came the popularity of the @ symbol. The @ symbol or the "at sign" separates a person's online user name from his mail server address. For instance, [email protected]